We are using cookies to provide statistics that help give you the best experience of our site. You can find out more or switch them off if you prefer. However, by continuing without changing settings, you are agreeing to our use of cookies.




*mandatory fields

I confirm that the data submitted in this webform may be used by Knights Brown for answering my enquiry. It may be held on record for business purposes for a period of 12 months.I do not consent to Knights Brown holding my data for business purposes.

Introduction

At Knights Brown we believe in putting our people first.

Our vision is to be a company people aspire to work for, where we will always endeavour to deliver the best experience for our customers.

For us we believe an inclusive business is essential to achieving our vision. That is why we have stated our commitment to attracting a more diverse range of people and supporting them in their development in our five year strategy.

In April 2018 Knights Brown employed 235 people and as such, there was no obligation for us to undertake a gender pay gap analysis. However, we looked on this as an opportunity to take stock of our position and be transparent. Regardless of our size, we are committed to improving our gender pay gap.

Today we employ over 300 people and our aim is to provide opportunities and fulfilling careers for all by growing sustainably. In this context, sustainably means embracing the wealth of skills and experiences available to us. Our guiding principles advocate a team spirit which recognises that everyone’s contribution matters. This is actively encouraged and measured in how we recruit and develop our people.

At Knights Brown, 84% of employees are men and 16% women. We are working to address this imbalance. Looking just at our emerging talent (apprentices, trainees, graduates and placement students) as of 5 August 2019, women account for 21.5%. Notably this year, we have recruited our first female apprentice groundworker.

We have two women in the senior leadership team contributing to the strategic direction of the business, one is a board director.

What is Gender Pay?

The gender pay gap is often confused with equal pay. It doesn’t measure equal pay, which relates to what men and women are paid in the same role for jobs of equal value. Gender pay shows the difference between what the average woman and the average man earns.

Our aim for reporting gender pay is to enable Knights Brown to look at closing this gap, which is particularly prevalent in the construction industry. External factors have played a significant part in where the industry is today. The gap cannot therefore, be fixed solely by focusing on the short term but rather, a long term strategy is required to help change perceptions in and out of the industry.

Calculations

Mean Gender Pay Gap

This calculation shows the difference between the mean rates of pay for men and women, expressed as a percentage.

How we calculate the mean difference

  •  The total hourly rates of pay for men divided by the total number of men = men’s mean pay
  •  The total hourly rates of pay for women divided by the total number of women = women’s mean pay

The mean hourly rate of pay for men:

  • £21.35

The mean hourly rate of pay for women:

  • £16.07

The difference between the two figures is:

  • 24.7%

Median Gender Pay Gap

This calculation shows the difference between the median rates of pay for men and women, expressed as a percentage.

How we calculate the median difference

  • The median is the middle value in a list of numbers ordered numerically

The median hourly rate of pay of men:

  • £15.87

The median hourly rate of pay for women:

  • £13.64

The difference between the two figures is:

  • 14.05%

Proportion of men and women employed in each pay quartile

Pie charts showing the proportion of men and women employed in each pay quartile

Closing the Gap

At Knights Brown we have taken steps to improve the workplace environment for women and to encourage them into construction careers. This includes:

  • Enhanced maternity and shared parental leave provision.
  • Flexible working practices. In April 2018, 5.5% of our people worked a non-standard week. It is now 8.25%.
  • Providing safety equipment tailored for women.
  • Supporting school activities: Exercises designed to encourage construction related careers amongst all young people and practical advice on interview techniques and CVs.
  • Working with Fareham College’s Employers’ Group to ensure a pipeline of both male and female groundworker apprentices are recruited and developed.

Our aim is not only to attract and engage more women into the workplace but also encourage applicants from other under-represented groups.

We will continue to work with schools and already have the following activities underway:

  • Recruitment training
  • Mental health first aiders training programme
  • Improved transparency in career development e-learning